Major-General Rudolf Anton Carl Freiherr von Slatin (1857-1932): Three Faiths

Said to be the inspiration for one of Karl May’s characters, von Slatin is one of those characters who make us feel utterly inadequate.

Born the son of a Jewish convert to Catholicism near Vienna, he was in the commercial academy when his father died rather suddenly.  By chance he heard of an opening at a German bookstore in Cairo.  The sheer unlikelihood appealed to him, and he was off to Egypt.

All thoughts of bookselling left him as he joined Theodore von Heuglin,  explorer and ornithologist into the mountains of Dar Nuba in Sudan.  Rough times and much rebellion in the area at the time, and Europeans were few.  Before he was through, von Slatin met such luminaries as botanist Dr Eduard Schnitzer (aka, Emin Pasha on his conversion to Islam, later to relieve Henry Morgan Stanley) and General Charles George Gordon. Continue reading

Karl May, 1842-1912 : Big In Germany

There was a blip on the radar screen with the 2012 centennial of his death, and a few translators have pushed through labor-of-love translations, but on the whole he is still remarkably unknown in America.   This from a man who was the largest selling author in the German language, bigger than Thomas Mann or Erich Maria Remarque, or – well, everyone, really.

So why the indifference?  It’s not as if his work is introspective dark philosophical central European doomsday jobs.  He wrote page turners.  Good page turners.  It can take a little bit to get into the spirit of the thing – we are talking a nineteenth century writer here – but once hooked, you will be hard pressed find the work anything but compelling.  He has narrative drive up the wazoo, and could teach pretty much anyone writing thrillers today a thing or two about action. Continue reading

St. Lidwina (1380 – 1433): Skateaway

Our daughter has taken to ice skating in a big way and raised the question of where the sport originated.   Google tells us that pre-historic types   strapped bones to their feet and trekked across ice with these and some sort of ur-ski poles.  Sounds more utilitarian than anything else.   As far as free form  goes, it was the Dutch who came up with the idea of metal blades and real boots some time in the thirteenth century.

What you see here is the first visual representation of ice-skates.  The girl in blue is named Lidwina, from the Dutch town of Schiedam, near Rotterdam.   Her father had come from a family that had once been rich  and respected but fallen on hard times;  her mother had never known any but poverty.   Together these two produced nine children, one of them Lidwina, who took an early and serious interest in matters religious. Continue reading